Seafood and leek crepes with smoked gruyere bechamel

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Putting pliable pastries to good use, stuffed with sautéed leeks, crab and shrimp, then topped with a smoked Gruyère béchamel and broiled.  One of the best crepe compilations outside of Mom’s asparagus and mushroom — though we’re no longer fond of those squirrely chopped stalks that’ll squirt free under pressure of a fork:  Preferable they are kept whole and wrapped, disseminated in a civilized fashion at the table.

These have sniffed about the borders since pancake day, sometime back, and were sliding toward the sad domain of leek souffle — and especially after a visit down to Frank, where he explained they’d been shortchanged of late, so none of his famous crab cakes were on the plate.  Frank was looking a little thin, generally, though he had some scrod and that sort of dry-looking salmon.

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Several more poor or costly options led to the Gardein crabless patties, and a seemingly conflicted combination of plant products and crustaceans, which met up with the sautéed leeks quite nicely, and paired with the smokey bechamel exceptionally.  Monsterously delicious recipe from MyKitchenInSpain.

Continue reading Seafood and leek crepes with smoked gruyere bechamel

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Black beans and shrimp

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A bit of a twist on the feijoada thing, tossing in shrimp with the beans.  Though Jen thought it needed more, the strong flavors of the dish largely overwhelmed the shrimp to the point they were barely a factor.  They would probably be better off just sauteed up in a little garlic butter and wine, and served on the side…

Irrespective, the dish was quite nice, a nice take on the dish and quite familiar to the stew of yore, with citrus additions of orange and lime, and lots of garlic.  Sweet potato being a banished substance, it was replaced with butternut squash that contrasted very nicely with the other flavors, the rich, earthy sweetness a nice — and subtle — contrast with the beans, salt and citrus.

Note that the slivered squash was pan roasted as opposed to oven, as the latter was imagined prone to scorching and overly effortful for such a small portion.

Very similar flavors to the veggie times variety — though that, of course, wouldn’t be true if the v.t. version wasn’t tweaked…

Fresh rolls

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Shrimp, noodles, green onion, mint, cilantro and lettuce.  Served with zippy peanut sauce and a side of saucy baked potatoes.

 

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A very well behaved and leash-trained cat at the market.

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Moqueca de camarao

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The delightful and light moqueca capixaba is quite nice but left lingering thoughts of dende, coconut milk and spice.  The first time we tried this, the recipe called for ground cashews — so that’s what we do!  Otherwise, straightforward and simple:  Onion, garlic, poblano, tomatoes, cayenne, lemon, broth and seasoning to taste, with a little cilantro mixed in at the end and then sprinkled on top.  So simple but just an outstanding assortment of flavors.  Rich and marvelous, it would be a shame to dilute it over rice — mopping up best left to family favorite, pao de quejo.

The slightly indulgent meal is fully justified by the tremendous degree of exertion over the 4th, exploding colorful bombs in wag-tongued frenzy above our house.  Being the fourth, the meal was followed by an all-American strawberry/rhubarb pie.  We were fortunate to all have a slice before much of it was devoured by that darn dog.

 

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Brown butter shrimp and pesto roll with arugula, jicama and provolone

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Mentioning avocado would obviously make the title too long.  It was also lost in the plot.

Shrimp sauteed in garlicky browned butter with a splash of brandy, then toasted on a pesto ladened roll under provolone.  Topped with avocado, jicama and arugula.

Wonderful combination of flavors; a very satisfying crunch and contrast from the cool and chipper jicama.